Naomi Wilson (Courtesy IA Dept. of Public Safety)

Naomi Wilson (Courtesy IA Dept. of Public Safety)

Naomi Wilson

Missing Person

Naomi Wilson
Age at Report: 32 YOA
DOB: August 20, 1948
Weight: 112 lbs.
Height: 5′ 03″
Race: African American
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Black
Incident Type: Endangered / physical
Missing From: 1618 13th Ave. SE
Cedar Rapids, IA
Linn County
NCIC Number: M955526709
Missing Since: April 12, 1981

Case summary by Jody Ewing
Linn CountyLinn County in Iowa
Cedar Rapids in Linn County
Cedar Rapids in Linn County

Naomi Wilson was reported missing to the Cedar Rapids Police Department in Cedar Rapids on April 12, 1981.

She was last seen at her Cedar Rapids home located at 1618 13th Ave. SE, about 4 p.m. by her boyfriend.

According to the boyfriend, she did not attend church that day as she usually did but otherwise behaved normally. The boyfriend went to Wilson’s residence after attending the church’s noon services, and said he and Wilson left her residence within minutes of each other. Wilson allegedly planned to get gas for her vehicle and then visit a friend with whom she worked at the Harnischfeger Corporation plant. She never arrived.

The boyfriend went to his mother’s home, but says he passed Wilson’s car about an hour after he left her residence.

Two days after Wilson’s disappearance, her white 1978 Ford Fairmont (license plate no. DOY622) was discovered in a K-Mart parking lot at 2727 16th Ave. SW., though Wilson was nowhere to be found.

Wilson — who has been described as a level-headed and reliable individual — had been divorced for three years when she disappeared. She’d purchased her Cedar Rapids home and her vehicle the previous summer, and those who knew her said it was uncharacteristic of her to leave without warning.

Foul play has long been suspected in Naomi Wilson’s disappearance but police have found little evidence indicating what happened.

Information Needed

If you have information regarding her disappearance, please contact the Cedar Rapids Police Department at 319-286-5374, or the Missing Person Information Clearinghouse / Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation at 1-800-346-5507.

Sources:

 

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10 Responses to Naomi Wilson

  1. liberty says:

    We need to start looking at Wendell Beets, the sex offender pentecostal minister brother of Naomi’s boyfriend Corbet Beets.

  2. liberty says:

    Or else we could be looking at her boyfriend Colbert Beets’ son, Tony Lee Beets, who attempted to rape a female acquaintance at knifepoint. According to the Cedar Rapids paper in 1995:

    “Tony L. Beets, 31, 1019 Sixth Street SE, charged with felony assault with intent to commit sexual abuse with bodily injury, accused of entering residence of a female acquaintance carrying a knife, striking her, and announcing he was going to force her to have sex. The woman escaped”

    The 1019 Sixth Street SE residence had been used by various of the Beetses over the years as a residence, including by Colbert Beets.

    Another interesting thing is that after Naomi’s disappearance, her boyfriend Colbert was living in the house for months, until it was foreclosed on.

    In September of 1981, Colbert and his kid were living in Naomi’s house, and the Cedar Rapids paper reported this:

    “Car crashes into house, 3 injured.

    Charges of drag racing and reckless driving have been filed against the driver of a car involved in an accident early Saturday on Mount Vernon Road near 14th Street SE. Three persons were injured in the incident. Richard beets, 17, of 1743 Six Avenue SE [by the way, this was at the time the address of Paul Beets, one of Colbert's brothers] was charged after his car slammed into the rear of a station wagon driven by James E. Pirtle, of 1513 17th Ave. SE, causing Pirtle’s car to roll over, onlookers said. Apparently out of control following the impact, Beets’ car crossed the median and crashed in into the side of an unoccupied apartment house at 1407 Mount Vernon Road SE. Pirtl was taken by Area Ambulance to Mercy Hospital, where he was listed in good condition on Saturday. “Two passengers in Beets’ car apparently walked away from the scene of the accident but were treated at Mercy and released. They were Melissa Carr, 16, of 720 15th St. SE and Colbert Beets, 17, of 1618 13th Ave. SE. The “loud crash” of the collision brought more than 30 onlookers to the site to see what happened.”

    Now, the 1618 13th Ave. SE. address was none other than the address of Naomi’s house. Also, there was no 17YO Colbert Beets. Rather, there was a teenage Terry Lee Beets who was 16 or 17 at the time. Presumably, Terry was in the car and had given a fake name.

    In fact, another article provides additional insight:

    “Drag-racing car hits house.
    Police responded to the scene of a personal injury accident at Mount Vernon Road and 14th St. SE shortly before 1 a.m. today. Initial reports were sketchy, but it is believed the car slammed into a house into the residence at 1407 Mount Vernon Road SE and burst into flame. The Cedar Rapids Fire Department was summoned to extinguish the blaze. A Linn County Sheriffs Department spokesman said a deputy was attempting to stop two drag-racing vehicles which reportedly were traveling faster than 100 mph shortly before the accident happened. After the crash, the spokesman said, several occupants of the vehicle ran from the scene. Cedar Rapids police and deputies were combing the area in an attempt to locate them early today. At least one of the occupants was taken to St. Luke’s Hospital for treatment of injuries. It was not immediately known in anyone was in the residence when it was struck.”

    Also, later on Colbert had a son Marcus, born September 25, 1982. Marcus would have been (assuming he was born on or about the right date) conceived around New Year’s Eve.

    What, if anything, did Colbert know about Naomi not coming back?

    Also, Naomi’s house was put into foreclosure in January, 1982, meaning that nobody had paid the mortgage on it for quite a while. Why was Colbert living in the house in 1981 if he wasn’t paying for it?

    In any event, both Colbert’s brother Wendell Beets, and Colbert’s son Tony Lee Beets, have significant criminal histories, even if Wendell is holding himself out as a pastor of a church. Wendell attempted to assault a 19YO girl, and also assaulted a different 19YO for several years, starting when she was a juvenile. Here is from a 1992 Cedar Rapids article:

    “Pastor quits amid sex allegations, By Rick Smith, Gazette staff writer.
    There was no regular Friday evening prayer meeting last night at the Sound Doctrine Church on Cedar Rapids’ southwet side. In fact, though a church building remains at 716 Egth Ave. SW there isn’t a church congregation there anymore. Its pastor of nearly 20 years — The Rev. Wendell Beets, 828 Camburn Ct. SE — has been forced to resign, his congregation left to reel amid an accusation of Beets’ sexual impropriety with a 19-year-old female church member. And one accusation is bring similar ones from other females, say two ministers in Beets’ former church, Louisa and Clarence Ellis of Cedar Rapids. The Ellises say Beets– the brother of Bishop Paul Beets of Gospel Tabernacle Church in Cedar Rapids — allegedly abused the 19-year-old victim for several years. And they say he admitted misdeeds three weeks ago in fromt of 50 members of the 150-member church. He then resigned and ince has reportedly left town with his family. The alleged victim has been interviewed by the Linn County Sheriff’s Department and the Cedar Rapids Police Department, the Elises say. They expect criminal charges against Beets will be forthcoming. In a recent interview in their Southeast-side home, the Ellises shared their distress over Beets’ actions. In one breath, they admitted that he was a pastor they held in high esteem for his abilities in preaching to his church. “He always taught the word of God. He was a great teacher,” said Mrs. Ellis. But in the next breath, they admit that is a word that has come tumbling down. “That he would attack a 19-year-old girl,” said Mr. Ellis. “I knew him very well. But not well enough.” The accusations against Beets, though, are not a complete surprise, the Ellises conceded. Beets was a “flirt” outside of church, the Ellises alleged. “He was another man when he was not in the church,” said Mrs. Ellis. Among her wishes, she said, was that the public know exactly why Beets resigned from his church, in hopes that knowledge would prevent him from establishing another church. They feared he would victimize some other female who had come to trust in him as a spiritual leader. “Nobody’s going to stop me from preaching,” Mrs. Ellis said Beets promised in the wake of his resignation. He also promised he would surrender to authorities to face a criminal charge, the Ellises said. “Clarence Ellis said Beets’ resignation has destroyed the Sound doctrine Church. He said some members were hoping to start a new church in a new building with a new name in an effort to find a fresh start. In the three weeks since Beets’ departure, the Ellises, to their surprises, have found themselves criticized for talking about Beets’ resignation. Mrs. Ellis said last night she expected a new round of criticism now that Beets’ story is going public. “I’m so tired of it all,” said Mrs. Ellis. “After tonight, I expect it to start up again.””

    I don’t have much more time tonight, to continue my commentary, but will later on. I” provide additional quotes from newspaper articles, and so forth.

    By the way, Wendell Beets was convicted of attempting to assault his young parishioner, just like his nephew was convicted of attempting to rape the other victim.

    Also, please note that Wendell did, indeed, start up another congregation. Until the past few days (when I started poking around and the church’s website then mysteriously was taken down) his lying and misleading bio on his church’s website said:

    “Elder Wendell A. Beets, Senior Pastor
    Elder Wendell A. Beets is a native of Thornton, Arkansas, born to Mr. and Mrs. Richard Beets. He is a veteran who served his country in the United States Air Force. He also attended COE College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Elder Wendell Anthony Beets was united in holy matrimony to Ms. Lenora Carpenter on October 22, 1975 in Louise, Mississippi. From this union were born three children: Tamara Lynette, Patrick Anthony, and Erika Navette. In 1994, the Lord blessed the Beets family with the precious gift of Eric Gibson.
    Elder Beets accepted Christ and his call to the ministry under the leadership of our Present Jurisdictional Presiding Prelate, The Honorable Bishop Hurley Bassett Sr. he was subsequently ordained in the Church of God in Christ, Inc., and founded Sound Doctrine Church of God in Christ in October of 1977. Elder Beets pastored Sound Doctrine COGIC for fifteen years before resigning in 1992. After his resignation, he notified Bishop Hurley Bassett Sr. that he was recommending his Assistant Pastor, Elder Joseph A. Pledge to become the new Pastor of Sound Doctrine COGIC. Elder Pledge was appointed pastor, and later changed the name of the church to New Life Church of God in Christ which is presently located at 1328 K. Street SW, Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
    Elder Beets evangelizd until a small bible study group began to meet in his home in 1992. From this group Word of Faith Pentecostal Church of God in Christ was founded. Supt. Richard L. Daye was appointed the first pastor by the Honorable Bishop Hurley Bassett Sr., Presiding Prelate of the Iowa Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction of the Church of God in Christ, Inc. After one year of pastoralship, Supt. R.L. Daye recommended that Elder Wendell A. Beets become the Pastor. Pastor Beets’ greatest desire was to build the new modified architectural design of the future Word of Faith Pentecostal COGIC Worship Center.
    Pastor Beets’ vision to build the people of God a new worship center has come to pass. In the spring of 2004, God blessed Word of Faith Pentecostal COGIC to complete the remodeling of its present facility, which is located at 2325 16th Avenue SW, Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
    Elder Beets continues to excel in ministry and God has allowed him to find favor in the sight of men. Elder Beets served and continues to serve the church fervently in many capacities such as: Assistant Supt. Of the WD Smith District COGIC, YPWW Youth Dept. President of the WD Smith District, President of the WD Smith District AIM Convention of the Depts of Evangelism, Home & Foreign Missions, Music, Sunday School, and Youth. Pastor Beets is also a United States’ Chaplain’s Association member. He has completed advanced ministry courses such as Growing Through Bible Study, Good News About Jesus, The Way in Marriage, and Roman’s Bible Study Courses Series.
    God has so blessed the Word of Faith Pentecostal Church under the influence of Pastor & Missionary Beets. They continue to endeavor to serve the Lord’s church, His people and to fulfill the vision that the Lord has given them.
    “It has always been my desire to never turn the people of God to myself but to always teach them to walk, trust, and depend on God. I have observed many ministries that have turned the people to themselves and not to God. In the words of the Apostle Paul, ‘I am crucified with Christ; nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave Himself for me.’” – Pastor Wendell A. Beets”

    And, before the church’s website was mysteriously taken down in the past few days, his wife’s bio said:

    “First Lady Lenora Beets

    Missionary Lenora Beets is a native of Louise, Mississippi, born to Mr. and Mrs. Allen Carpenter. She is a graduate of Mississippi Valley State University, earning a degree in Office and Business Administration. In October of 1975, Ms. Lenora Carpenter was united in Holy Matrimony to Elder Wendell Anthony Beets in Louise, Mississippi. From this union were born 3 children: Tamara Lynette, Patrick Anthony, and Erika Navette. In 1994, the Lord blessed the Beets family with the precious gift of Eric Gibson.

    Missionary Beets was called to the Missionary field and received her Evangelist Missionary license in 1979 from the late Mother Ruth Robinson, Jurisdictional State Supervisor of Women, and the Honorable Bishop Hurley Bassett Sr., Jurisdictional Prelate of Iowa Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction of Church of God in Christ, Inc., while attending the Sound Doctrine Church of God in Christ under the pastoralship of her husband, Elder Wendell A. Beets.

    Evangelist Beets has certainly proven herself to be a virtuous woman. She exemplifies the roles of a wife, mother, and missionary. Her spiritual gifts have allowed her to excel in ministry. She has served the church in such capacities as Sunday School teacher, secretary in the MW Goodman District, WD Smith District YPWW chairlady. She presently serves as District Missionary of the WD Smith District and Assistant Supervisor to Supervisor Rosalie J. Kaiser of the Iowa Jurisdiction Women’s Department.

    In addition to her works in ministry, she is also the owner and operator of Cuddley Duddley Childcare Services. Evangelist Beets also volunteers her time in the community. She has represented Faith Community Building the Gap for over 20 years. She is an activist for accessing health care for the African American community and is active in a federally funded Anti-Drug and Violence Coalition, which presently focuses on HIV/AIDS, cardiovascular health and cancer. Evangelist Beets has proven to be a true advocate by bringing awareness to the value of health screenings to her local congregation. She is trained and certified for the fright against HIV/AIDS. She also participated in the 2006 three mile walk to increase public awareness of the spread of HIV/AIDS in the community. Evangelist Beets works hard to empower her congregation and community to become more involved in a proactive stand on health issues.

    Evangelist Beets is a member of the Linn County Prayer Ministry. She also works closely with her husband in the ministry at Word of Faith Pentecostal Church of God in Christ. Together they continue to work in areas to enhance church membership and strengthen spiritual development. They stress the importance of acknowledging God and following the direction of the Holy Spirit. They strive to demonstrate positive attitudes toward church development and growth without failing to let men and women know that the greatest gift is love and the only security is in Jesus Christ.”

    Another weird thing is that one of Colbert’s brothers (presumably either Wendell or Paul, was the one that found Naomi’s car in the K-mart parking lot. Gee, how convenient! I wonder how, in a city of over 100,000, he knew to look there, even though it was miles from her house. I’ll try to get going and type up a copy of that article and post it, also.

  3. liberty says:

    I’m not sure that law enforcement has ever realized that Bennie Wilson, Naomi Wilson’s ex husband, was none other than Colbert Beets’ nephew, which puts a hugely different spin on things. Creepy? Scary? Putting a new spin on things? Specifically, Bennie’s mother was Lavernia (Beets) Wilson, who was Colbert Beets’s older sister. Colbert was purportedly in April of 1981 Naomi’s boyfriend of the past year.

    At least one member of the Beets family is wholly capable of covering up and/or ignoring serious sexual assaults, and I don’t see why such an individual wouldn’t be capable of covering up serious homicides. Specifically, if you look at the “What Happened to Paula?” website you can see that the Cedar Rapids Police Chief had the opinion that Wendell Beets was wholly aware of what happened to Paula Oberbroeckling and his sister’s role in it. So if Wendell is capable of covering up for a family member’s role in Paula Oberbroeckling’s death, he’s capable of covering up for a family member’s role in Naomi Wilson’s death (if he didn’t do it himself).

    I’ve also been doing google map searches. IF Naomi was killed at her home, and if the perp is familiar with Cedar Rapids the most logical thing is, if the perp does NOT have a car, to wait until it is dark and drag/carry her out the back of her house, down the alley, into St. John’s Cemetery, from there into Van Vechten Park, and then either bury her there, dump her in the Cedar River, or find somewhere down Otis Road and dump her along the river, in the woods, etc. HOWEVER, Wendell would have been aware from his involvement in or knowledge of Paula Oberbroeckling’s death and the hiding and discovery of her corpse, that dumping a corpse in the Otis Road area would be a bad idea. Now, if there was a car involved, then who knows where the body was buried/dumped (likely buried, given the three decades without remains being found).

    It is also VERY weird that the K-mart parking lot at 2727 16th Ave. SW where her car was found (by Colbert’s brother, not identified by first name in the newspaper article) is exactly two tenths of a mile by foot (a very short walk, in other words) from where Wendell’s church is presently, which is 2325 16th Ave. SW.

    Also, there’s another coincidence that likely is not relevant, but is still strange. In 1976, Naomi’s to-be and ex- husband Bennie Wilson (evidently from Cedar Rapids who then moved around to various places including Chicago and Denver) was living at 1407 Mt. Vernon road SE. That is the same address of the purportedly vacant residence that Richard Beets crashed the car into, in September of 1981.

    It is interesting to me that Naomi’s house at 1618 13th Ave SE was six tenths of a mile from 1007 6th Street Southeast, which was one of the addresses of a house OWNED by Tony Lee Beets (the knife-wielding would-be rapist son of Colbert).

    Naomi’s house at 1618 13th Ave SE was also only four tenths of a mile from the house that Colbert bought at 1021 9th Street Southeast on contract in 1976. Of course, that in itself is not suspicious, but what the bloody heck was he doing living in her house after her disappearance considering he owned a house himself at the time?

    Moreover, Naomi’s house at 1618 13th Ave. SE was only four tenths of a mile from the house that Wendell was living in in 1981, that being 1123 19th Street Southeast.

    Numerous houses owned by the Beets brothers and their kids and their churches have been involved in serious criminal activity over the years. It most certainly also appears that the so-called Reverend Paul Beets condoned his sex-offender brother’s actions and covered up for him and immediately after Wendell’s sentencing got him right back in the position of being a church minister. It also appears that the Beets family, and their associated churches at times, swap houses for no apparent reason (leading one to wonder just what the real reason is).

    Naomi was definitely killed by someone in the Beets family, be it with the last name Beets or a different last name but nonetheless related

  4. liberty says:

    I meant to write below that Colbert was purportedly in April of 1981 Naomi’s boyfriend of the past three years, not just a year. I was too tired when writing.

  5. liberty says:

    I think it would be helpful for me to provide the various articles and legal notices from the Cedar Rapids Gazette pertaining to Naomi, and then, as I have time, provide information on the more criminally-minded members of the Beets family.

    Naomi went missing on April 12, 1981, purportedly, but I think it could have been as early as 6:00 a.m. on April 11, 1981, based on the newspaper articles and the lack of anyone other than a Beets family member to say that she was purportedly seen on April 12.

    April 16, 1981, Cedar Rapids Gazette:

    “Friends help search for missing C.R. woman

    “Citizens and police today continued their search for Naomi Wilson, 32, of 1618 13th Ave. SE, who was last seen Sunday night Police received reports from Wilson’s friends Monday that Wilson had left home at 5:30 p.m. Sunday to visit a woman friend, but she never made it to her friend’s house. Wilson
    was also expected at work at the Harnischfeger Corp. plant Monday night, but she never showed up for work either, police said.

    “From what we’ve found out about her, it’s not like her to not show up for Work,” said Assistant Chief James Barnes of the detective bureau. “She had good work habits.”

    “Wednesday morning, an estimated 30 citizens, led by the Rev. Paul Beets, a friend of Wilson’s, borrowed four walkie-tailie units from the Linn County Civil Defense Department, according to Bill Bjorenson, civil defense director. Beets and the citizens started a search near the west-side K mart parking lot, where Wilson’s car was found Monday night, Bjorenson said.

    “Members of Beets’ family said the search was continued today. Bjorenson explained his role in the search. “I went out there and showed them how to set up a search pattern,” Bjorenson said. “We checked through a big forested area near the parking lot behind the truck service center to the east of K-mart. We formed lines and crisscrossed a huge area. We didn’t find anything,” Bjorenson said. While Bjorenson and Beets’ search party covered the ground, the city’s police helicopter hovered over-head, assisting in the search, Bjorenson said.

    “Police have no evidence to suggest foul play was involved in Wilson’s disappearance, according to Wallace Johnson, assistant chief of police in charge of the patrol division. Barnes said Wilson was last seen in her personal car, a white 1978 Ford Fairmont, license DOY 622. A black woman with medium-length hair, she was last seen wearing a two-piece black pantsuit. If anyone has any information on the whereabouts of Naomi Wilson, they are asked to contact the Cedar Rapids Police Detectives Bureau.”

    April 25, 1981 (Cedar Rapids Gazetts).
    “Why would a 32-year-old Cedar Rapids woman walk away and leave her house, her car, a good job and friends and family who love her? That’s the puzzle behind the disappearance of Naomi Wilson, 1618 13th Ave. SE. Last seen on Sunday afternoon, April 12, her car was found two afternoons later in the K-mart parking lot at 2727 16th Ave. SE. Police have not ruled out foul play in connection with Wilson’s disappearance. But neither is there enough evidence at this point to suggest someone may have killed her, according to police sources. Wilson is one of three adults reported missing to Cedar Rapids Police since Jan. 1. Three detectives have been assigned to investigate her disappearance, and the investigation has generated a thick file of reports. Wilson’s is one of 23 unsolved missing-person cases on file with Cedar Rapids Police since 1978. Fourteen of those reports involve juveniles.
    BUT Naomi Wilson was more than just another name on a list to people who knew her — people such as her brothers John and Lorenzo Pollard, who hurried here from Atlanta last week to join in the search for their sister; and Colbert “Billy” Beets, her boyfriend for three years.

    “Naomi Wilson would not go away without letting someone know where she was, agreed both John Pollard, interviewed this week by phone, and Beets, who was interviewed at The Gazette. “She’s very level-headed,” Pollard continued. “She thinks about building up her life in many ways.” “She’s real friendly,” Beets said. “She’s pleasant to talk to,” not necessarily outgoing, he said. Her temper occasionally flared, “but she was plain-spoken. She didn’t beat around the bush. If she didn’t like something, she’d say so.” Both men said they knew her to be a reliable worker at Harnischfeger, where she worked in materials- handling and later at a factory “checkpoint.” “It’s most unusual for someone to up and leave a job where you’re making $1,000 a month,” Pollard continued. “She has acquired furniture, a car, and bought a house last July. She had been buying things to fix up the house,” he said.

    “Naomi and her brothers were raised in Birmingham, Ala. After high school she moved to Chicago, where she married Bennie Wilson. The couple divorced three years ago, some time after moving to Cedar Rapids. Since remarrying, Bennie Wilson now lives in Denver. Sunday, April 12 started normally, Beets said, when he went to church. Although she didn’t go that day, Naomi also usually attended church. Beets said he returned from a noon church service during midafternoon. The two left Naomi’s house within minutes of each other about 4 p.m., Beets said. Beets went to his mother’s house with some ice. Wilson went to get gasoline for her car and to visit a woman she worked with at Harnischfeger.

    “But the friend told Beets later Naomi never showed up. Beets and Wilson passed each other on the street an hour later, he said. That was the last time he saw her. When she didn’t return home, Beets said he searched for her until 3 a.m. Monday. He and others searched again for her Monday. “I still didn’t report it to the police, and I still didn’t put it out on the street, because I didn’t want to get everyone’ all stirred up and have her drive up all of a sudden.” When another Harnischfeger employee phoned Beets to let him know Naomi never showed up for work Monday, Beets called police. Friends searched the city by car Tuesday and Beets’ brother found Naomi Wilson’s car at the K-mart at 2:55 p.m., according to police reports. More friends, aided by the Linn County ‘Civil Defense office, searched a wooded area near K-mart Wednesday, April 15. Beets feels police could have done more the day after they were told Naomi Wilson was missing. For example, at one point he flagged down a uniformed police officer while he was trying to find Naomi’s car. He asked the officer if he’d seen the car, and the officer didn’t know that the police had put out an “attempt to locate” report on Wilson’s car. “I don’t believe they even looked for the car,” Beets said. And when the car was found at Kmart, police didn’t take fingerprints off the car at the scene, Beets added. Instead, officers checked the car and its trunk at the scene and allowed him to drive it home.

    “I think they’ve done a poor job,” said Pollard. “I don’t think they took the missing person report seriously when it was first reported. Being from the South, and being black, I grew up knowing that if you’re white, the police jump on the case. If you’re black, they wait around a little before acting.” Beets and Pollard seem to have opposite “gut feelings” about the case, when each was asked to speculate her fate. “I guess I have a positive attitude,” Pollard said. “I don’t have that gut feeling that something is wrong with her right now.” He just hopes that “if some person or persons are holding her,” that she can break free and call her family. “My parents in Birmingham are upset now,” Pollard added. “They’ve lost two of my brothers, one in ’58 and one in ’72.” Beets seemed to suspect foul play. “Something would just have to have happened to her,” he said. “I can never believe that she would just leave town,” he said.

    January 21, 1982. Cedar Rapids Gazette, legal publications section:
    “ORIGINAL NOTICE EQ. NO. 5821
    In the Iowa District Court for Linn County
    BANCO MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff,
    vs .
    NAOMI WOLSOM and LINN COUNTY, IOWA,
    Defendants.
    To the Defendant, Naomi Wilson.
    You are notified that there is now on file in the office of the clerk of the above Court a petition for a judgment in rem against real estate situated in Linn County, Iowa, described as follows:
    Lot 12, Block 3, Oak Park Addition to Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa, and known locally as 1618 13th Avenue SE , Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
    Plaintiff prays its judgment in rem against the real estate in the a m o u n t of $35,068.89 together with interest from December 1, 1981 at the rate of 11½ percent Interest per annum, for the costs, including reasonable attorneys fees for Plaintiff’s attorneys, Shuttleworth & Ingersoll, and for future deficiencies in the trust account, and foreclosure of the mortgage given by Naomi Wilson to Plaintiff covering the real estate previously described and that the lien of Plaintiff’s mortgage be found and decreed to be superior to the rights, interest and lien to each of the Defendants. No personal judgment is sought against any of the Defendants.
    The Plaintiff’s attorney is Kevin H. Collins of Shultleworth & Ingersoll, 500 Merchants National bank Building, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52401.

    “You are further notified that unless you serve and within a reasonable time thereafter file a written special appearance , motion or answer in the Iowa District Court in and for Linn County, at the Courthouse in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on or before the 5th day of March, 1982, judgment by default will be
    entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition.
    Kenneth L. Perry , Jr.
    Clerk of the Above Court
    Linn County Courthouse
    Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52401
    By Linda Barrett, Deputy”

    January 28, 1982 and February 4, 1982 (Cedar Rapids Gazette, legal publications section)
    ORIGINAL NOTICE. Probate No. PR9665-0182
    In the Iowa District Court for Linn County
    IN THE MATTER OF THE CONSERVATORSHIP OF NAOMI WILSON, Absentee.
    TO PROPOSED WARD NAOMI WILSON: You are notified that there Is now on file in the office of the Clerk of the above Court a Petition for Appointment of Conservator for Absentee pursuant
    to Iowa Code Section 633.580. The Petitioner’s attorney Is Kevin H. Collins, Shuttleworth &. Ingersoll, whose address Is P.O. Box 2107, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52406.
    You are further notified that this matter shall come on for hearing on the 5th day of March, 1982, at
    10:30 a.m. at which time the Court may appoint a conservator.
    Kenneth L. Perry , Jr.
    Clerk of the Above Court
    Linn County Courthouse
    Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52401
    By Linda Barrett, Deputy

    September 18, 1983 (Cedar Rapids Gazette):
    “Missing Persons Pose Different Kind of Puzzle
    At least three cases of people disappearing under unusual circumstances remain on Linn County records but no arrests have been made in these cases, because law enforcement officers are not sure that crimes were committed.
    The cases are officially filed under “missing persons,” and remain a puzzle despite extensive, searches and investigations. The disappearance of Naomi Wilson two years ago is the most recent case. Wilson, who was 32 at the time, left her house, car, job and family, never to return. The woman, who had a reputation for reliability, was last seen on April 12, 1981. Her name is among 26 on a recent police computer printout of missing persons. The list, compiled over the past three years,’ includes the names of 16 teenagers. Police said it changes almost daily, as missing persons
    are found or return home…Without evidence of foul play, said Assistant Police .Chief Jim Barnes, there is not much police can do. Even if police find someone, adult or juvenile, who has been reported missing, there is little officials can do except advise them that-their- relatives are’ worried about them, he continued. Many “missing persons” turn out to be juveniles who have run away or adults who have chosen to “drop out,” he said, Police officials will not comment publicly on the disappearances, but privately they indicate they believe both Lynn Schuller and Naomi Wilson are dead. They won’t comment on whether they believe the women were murdered.”

    March 22, 1992 (Cedar Rapids Gazette – general article on missing persons). Naomi’s portion reads:
    “Naomi Wilson, CEDAR RAPIDS — Why would a woman walk away and leave her house, her car, a good job and friends and family who love her? That’s the puzzle behind the disappearance of Naomi Wilson, 1618 13th Ave. SE. The single woman disappeared April 12, 1981. Her car was found two days later in the K mart parking lot, 2727 16th Ave. SW.

    “Foul play has long been suspected, but police found little if any evidence indicating what happened to Wilson. There have been no developments in the case for years.
    Repeated attempts by The Gazette to reach Wilson’s family were unsuccessful.”

    July 24, 1995: (Cedar Rapids Gazette) (article about missing persons mentions Naomi):
    “In Cedar Rapids, several cases are at a standstill because officers have nothing to go on, said detective Joel Kessler of the Cedar Rapids Police Department. The department keeps files on cases such as Naomi Wilson, who was last seen April 12, 1981. If she disappeared of her own ‘accord, Wilson, 32, who had a reputation for reliability, walked away from a house, car, job and family. Unless new information is received, officers do not actively investigate such cases, Kessler said…”

    So we know from the early articles that Naomi worked the night shift, which would be about 10 pm to 6 am, more or less. Her work-week started Monday night. If we exclude what Colbert says regarding when he last saw her, and anything that the Beets family may have claimed back in the day, then we can see that she likely would have last been seen by a reliable source about 6 a.m. Saturday, April 11, 1981.

  6. liberty says:

    Naomi was not the only young woman who worked at the Harnischfeger plant to mysteriously die/disappear in Cedar Rapids in 1981:

    September 10,1981 (Cedar Rapids Gazette):

    “Donna Marie Garth, 30, of 2801 A Ave NE [NOTE: These were known as the Lancer Apartments] died in a fire at her apartment early Wednesday morning. Story on page 1. Born Dec. 24, 1950, in Des Moines, she lived there until 1971. She was graduated from North High School in Des Moines, and began her career there. She was an employee of Harnischfeger in Cedar Rapids for the last seven years. Surviving are a son, Derrick Garth; her mother, Edna Marie and stepfather Douglas Cooley of Des Moines; four sisters, Evangeline Ruth Lee, Deborah McCaleb, Victoria Garth and Christine Willis, all of Cedar Rapids; five brothers, Donald Graves, Centerville; George Brown, Cedar Rapids; Robert Brown, Tracey Cooley and Jeffrey Brown, all of Des Moines; and grandparents, Alice Johnson and Charles Daye, both of Des Moines. Services: 1 p.m. Monday at the Estes Funeral Home, 13th & Forest, Des Moines. Friends may call at 1157 11th St., Des Moines.”

    Could Donna have been the one that Naomi was purportedly going to see, and was knocked off to keep a homicide quiet? The Beets family has been associated with a number of strange fires in houses over the years…

  7. liberty says:

    Another potential suspect in the Beets family is the nephew of Colbert Beets’ sister, Alvernia Beets Browning Franklin. Here are some stories about his criminal history, from the Cedar Rapids Gazette:

    March 10, 1976 (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
    “James Junior Browning received a sentence of up to seven years in the penitentiary, on his jury conviction on a false pretenses charge. The 28-year-old Cedar Rapids man was charged as an aider and abettor in the passing of a check at the Eagle store, 2828 First avenue NE, last Nov. 30.”

    April 7, 1976 (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
    “Three Jailed After Marble Chips Stolen “Three Cedar Rapids men were being held in lieu of $125 bond each in the Linn county jail Wednesday on charges of larceny. James Junior Browning, 28, of 1019 Eleventh avenue SE; Willie Benjamin Love, 32, of 523 Seventh avenue SE, and Jesse James Clark, 24, of 511 Tenth street SE, were arrested by Cedar Rapids police at about 2 a.m. Wednesday in the 1700 block of Fourth avenue SE. They are accused of stealing $8.89 worth of marble chips from Drug Town, 2405 Mt. Vernon road SE.

    May 10, 1976 (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
    “Woman Enters Pleas to Pair Of Linn Charges A 25-year-old Cedar Rapids woman Friday pled innocent to a charge of possession with intent to deliver heroin, but pled guilty to conspiracy to commit a felony, as action was taken against her in two Linn district court cases. Pamela Sue Collins, 846 Fifth avenue SE, pled innocent to charges that she possessed heroin and intended to deliver it. The charge was a result of a search of her residence April 21, in which Cedar Rapids police officers say they found three foils of heroin inside the house. However, Collins pled innocent to the charge while her attorneys continued to seek a test of the legitimacy of the search warrant under which . the drugs allegedly were found. A hearing on the search warrant is scheduled for June 15, while the trial is set for June 28. In another court action Friday, Collins pled guilty to the conspiracy charge, which results from her allegedly conspiring
    with James Junior Browning of Cedar Rapids to utter a forged instrument. That charge was filed Friday
    in connection with a forged check given the Times Camera Center at 1413 First avenue SE. The check passing, according to court records, was made on Nov. 18, 1975. Sentencing on the conspiracy charge will be June 4 at 1:15 p.m.

    May 5, 1977 (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
    “James Junior Browning received a sentence of up to five years in the penitentiary on a charge of receiving stolen property. The sentence is to be served consecutive to earlier concurrent sentences of up to seven years and up to ten years imposed earlier on charges of obtaining money under false pretenses and uttering a forged instrument. The 29-year-old Cedar Rapids man was accused of having possession of speakers valued at $3OO on Jan. 10, knowing they had been stolen. They had been reported stolen
    from a Cedar Rapids man. He remains free on appeal bond.”

    June 22, 1977 (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
    “James Junior Browning, 23, of 1251 Fourth avenue SE, was charged with larceny of a motor vehicle 1 a.m. Tuesday. The arrest was made in connection with a report filed by Pam Orr, 32, of 1432 A. Avenue NE.”

    March 16, 1981 (Cedar Rapids Gazette):
    “Theft charges. Two Cedar Rapids men were arrested Sunday on theft charges related to a purse-snatching incident Saturday afternoon. Jimmie L. Maclin, 27, of 1529 A Ave. NE and James Junior Browning, 33, Dubuque, were arrested at 5 p.m. Sunday at Town and Country Shopping Center. Maclin was charged with second-degree theft and Browning with third-degree theft. The charges were based on the complaint of a woman who told police her purse was taken from a shopping cart while she was shopping at the Eagles store, 4444 First Ave. NE. Browning also was charged with second-degree theft in connection with merchandise stolen from Kmart West Sunday afternoon. Both men were being held at the Linn County Jail this morning.”

    April 7, 1981 (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
    “2 men charged with extortion. Two men were arrested this noon on extortion charges as the result of a Cedar Rapids man’s complaint that someone had been extorting money from him for the past week. Arrested were James Junior Browning, 33, of 1019 11th Ave. SE and Jimmie Maclin, 27, of 1529 A Ave. NE. Both were arrested during the noon hour at the Exel Inn, 633 33rd Ave. SW, according to police reports. Maclin and Browning also were charged with possession of controlled substances. Marijuana was found in their possession when they were arrested, police said.” [

    NOTE: April 7, 1981 was a Wednesday. Was he bailed out during the week? Or did he spend the weekend in jail? If it can be determined that he spent the weekend in jail, then we can say that he was not responsible for Naomi going missing]. ALSO NOTE: a July 17, 1981 article speaks of him remaining free on bond.

    July 17, 1981 (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
    “James Junior Browning, 33, of 1019 11th Ave. SE, was found guilty Thursday of third- degree theft and conspiracy. A jury of six men and six women returned their verdict at 8:30 a.m. Page 5A. …
    “Browning guilty of theft, conspiracy. James Junior Browning, 33, of 1019 11th Ave. SE was found guilty Thursday of third-degree theft and conspiracy. A jury of six men and six women in Linn District Court returned the verdict at 8:30 a.m., Thursday, after-hearing closing arguments Wednesday afternoon by assistant county attorney Harold Denton and Browning’s attorney, Louis A. Merrifield. The charges stemmed from a March 14 purse snatching incident. His March 15 arrest followed a complaint by a Cedar Rapids woman that her purse had been taken from a shopping cart at the Eagle Supermarket, 5824 Council St. NE. At the time the purse was taken it contained a lady’s watch, checkbook
    and identification cards, according to police records. On March 14, a juvenile female forged a check for $500 in merchandise at K mart West, 2727 16th. Ave. SW.”
    “On March 15, two more checks were forged at stores in Westdale Mall. Those checks were for $350 in merchandise at Mr. Mark’s and $179 worth of merchandise at Radio Shack. However, an employee at
    Radio Shack, according to court records, thwarted the female’s efforts when he refused to take the check and notified Cedar Rapids police. The employee also gave police the license number of the female’s
    car. He testified at Browning’s trial that there were two men and two women in the car. Browning was apprehended at Town & Country Shopping Center on March 15 where he was seen leaving the car identified by the Radio Shack employee. When arrested, Browning had the watch in his possession, according to police reports. Merrifield stated in his closing arguments that if Browning knew the watch was stolen he would have discarded it before he was arrested by police at the Town & Country Shopping Center. Denton said in his closing arguments that in order to bring a verdict of conspiracy, the state had to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Browning had entered into an agreement with others to forge
    checks to obtain merchandise. The theft charge would have to be substantiated by proving that Browning was knowingly in possession of the watch, which was “in effect stolen,” he said.
    “It has not been proven beyond a reasonable doubt that Mr. Browning entered into an agreement” with the juveniles involved or had knowledge of such an agreement, Merrifield said.
    “Jury foreman, Raymond Wadkins Jr. of Cedar Rapids said in an interview following the trial, “there was quite a bit of discussion” among the jurors. “I think we arrived at a verdict that we were all comfortable
    with.”
    “Browning remains free on bond. Judge Harold Swailes set a second trial for Browning for Aug. 10 on charges of being an habitual offender. Browning is also charged with extortion stemming from a
    previous offense on April 7, 1981.

    August 12, 1981 (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
    “Browning convicted as habitual offender. James Junior Browning has been found to be a habitual criminal and faces another charge for failing to appear in court for the verdict that led to the habitual offender ruling. The 33-year-old Cedar Rapids man was found guilty of conspiracy in July, but he denied being the same James Junior Browning who was previously convicted of two other felonies, so another trial was scheduled to determine if he is the same person. If a person convicted of certain felonies, such as conspiracy, was previously convicted of two felonies, that person faces a jail term of up to
    15 years and must serve a minimum of three years in prison. In a trial Monday on the identity question, an assistant county attorney and a former assistant county attorney testified Browning was the same person convicted of false pretenses and receiving stolen property in cases they prosecuted in 1976 and 1977. Defense attorney Lew Merrifield argued that since there was no fingerprint identification, the jury should find that the identification had not been proven. The jury notified Judge Paul Kilburg after deliberating about an hour Monday afternoon that a verdict had been reached. Authorities were unable to contact Browning, so after about an hour the judge sent the jury home for the night and issued a warrant for Browning’s arrest.
    “When attempts to find Browning were unsuccessful, the jury returned its verdict about 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, finding that Browning is the same person convicted of the earlier offenses. On the basis of that verdict, the judge ruled that Browning is a habitual criminal. The county attorney’s office has filed a charge of failure to appear and has brought another count of being an habitual offender against Browning. The conspiracy charge and failure to appear charge carry a five-year-sentence each.”

    October 16, 1981 (Cedar Rapids Gazette):
    “Browning back in jail. Law officers picked up James Junior Browning, 33, in Seattle, Wash., Wednesday and returned him to Linn County, where he had been free on bond after being convicted of being a habitual offender. Browning, formerly of 1019 11th Ave. SE, was found guilty in July of third-degree theft and conspiracy. He remained free on bond when he was charged with being a habitual offender, and he did not appear in court when he was convicted of that count Aug. 10. At his July trial, Browning claimed he was not the same James Junior Browning convicted of two previous felonies. The August trial determined he was. Also arrested in Seattle Wednesday was Nancy J. Gowdy, 25, of Route 1, State Center, who was returned to Linn County to face a first-degree theft charge. Gowdy was charged July 16 with writing over $5,000 worth of bad checks on an account she knew to be closed. She formerly resided at 1600 A Ave. NE.”

    August 31, 1983 (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
    “Linn convictions upheld. The theft and conspiracy convictions of a Cedar Rapids man were upheld. The court ruled 3-2 that there was adequate evidence to support the Linn County District Court convictions of James Junior Browning. Browning had been charged with third-degree theft and conspiracy to commit false use of a financial instrument in connection with an incident at a Cedar Rapias shopping mall. Browning had argued that there was no evidence that he was involved in a conspiracy to use the stolen checks, but the majority of the court disagreed. “We are of the opinion that the facts established in the present case raise a reasonable inference that a conspiracy involving (Browning) was afoot,” said the decision. Browning had been accused of being involved in a stolen check conspiracy with two women. The women allegedly bought items at the mall using checks that had been in a purse stolen earlier that day, but left the mall when clerks became suspicious. They were seen getting into a car in which two men were sitting. Later, a similar car was seen at another shopping center. Browning was arrested a short time later hiding in a restroom. A watch that had been in the stolen purse was found on Browning and several items which had been purchased with the stolen checks were recovered from the car.”

    April 20, 1995 (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
    “ASSAULT CHARGES. James Junior Browning Sr., 47, 1060 Center Point Rd. NE; charged with assault while displaying a dangerous weapon; accused of striking Christina Blair in the head several times on Monday and displaying a knife and threatening to kill her.”

    September 30, 1995 (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
    “James Junior Browning, 47, 1060 Center Point Rd. NE; charged with assault causing bodily injury; accused of punching Christina Blair in the mouth on Sept. 23 at 1513 Bever Ave. SE.”

  8. liberty says:

    OK, a little more on James Browning, Jr., the nephew of Colbert Beets (the son of colbert’s sister Alvernia Beets Browning Franklin). Specifically, if you look at the “What Happened to Paula?” website you can see that in the course of the Paula Oberbroeckling investigation a femaled police science student reported to law enforcement that she had been raped by James Browning, Jr., who she thought was capable of foul play in connection with that investigation. She detailed sexual aggression by James Browning, Jr., perpetrated upon other young women, also.

    Given Naomi’s long-term involvement with the Beets family, my money is on either Wendell, James, or Colbert’s brother Tony Lee Beets. All of them have been sexually violent individuals. The Cedar Rapids Gazette really hasn’t done its job.

  9. liberty says:

    Another observation. Paula Oberbroeckling’s car was recovered near the Eagles parking lot on Mt. Vernon Rd. and 14th Street. That’s the same block where Naomi’s ex husband had been living and where her subsequent boyfriend Colbert’s nephew crashed the car.

  10. liberty says:

    Furthermore, the address of 1407 Mt. Vernon Rd. SE (where Naomi’s ex husband had been living and where her subsequent boyfriend Colbert’s nephew crashed the car) was also involved in the Paula Oberbroeckling investigation.

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